5 Marathi children songs that bring me smile!

A few days back I noticed a young mother’s Tweet about rapping Sassa Sassa Kapus Kasa to her twins. Her Tweet made me nostalgic and next day I woke up humming Asava Sundar Chocolate Cha Bangla. I wondered when was the last time I heard someone humming Marathi children songs… couldn’t recollect.

This weekend we eagerly went to watch second part of Bhai – a biopic on Maharashtra’s favourite writer, director, orator Pu La Deshpande. Bhai is a visual treat for all those who have read, watched, and heard Pu La Deshpande. The simple, emotional and beautiful rendition of Nach Re Mora Ambyachay Vanaat Naach again took me back to my childhood. After almost two decades I still enjoyed this song, mind going back to the time I use to listen to it as a young girl.

A young girl growing up in early 80s I was blissfully unaware about whom the writer, composer or singer was. For me, Naach Re Mora and some of other children songs were a part of my childhood. They bring memories of my aatya feeding me food while reciting Chandoba Chandoba Laplas Ka, me singing Nach Re Mora while playing on the swing… Somethings are so intrinsic to your upbringing that you do not want to associate them with anything else.. Like while watching Bhai I realized that song is written by GaDiMa and composed by Pu La Deshpande..

That evening I found myself searching for these songs on YouTube and reliving this childhood magic. Sharing with you my childhood favourites –

Asava Sundar Chocolate Cha Bangla: I imagined this bunglow while listening to this song. Chocolate chya banglyala toffee cha daar… I perceived this bunglow made of all chocolates from Nanu Mama’s shop, where we usually use to buy toffees and biscuits from. No wonder chocolate is my weakness!

Naach Re Mora: I think this was my all time favourite. I had never seen a real peacock, untill a few years back. My village tales were made of mango trees and rain. This song brought peacock’s picture in our school textbooks live to me. Maybe my liking for rains was subconsciously ingrained by this song?

Zuk Zuk Zuk Agingaadi: I have a funny memory of this song. My father use to take Mumbai local for work. All the stories of my village were related to ST bus or road travel. So I use to think who goes to a village by train?  One day I asked my Aaji, she said some people travel to village by train. The other train travel I associated was with Pune, as visiting Pune meant going by Deccan Queen. Somehow I associated the train in this song with this.. Again I had never visited Pune till then.

Chandoba Chandoba Bhaglas Kaa: Our house had big wooden window overlooking a tall tree. Watching the moon over this tree is one of my distinct childhood memories. As a toddler, my aatya use to make me sit near this window to feed. This song was her way of making me eat.

Gori Gori Pan Phulsakhi Chan, Dada Mala Ek Vahini Aan: I liked the rhythm of this song. I imagined a Vahini been pampered and loved. I got this love from my family in reality. I liked the hot chapattis that Aai prepared. This song refers to Poli and Shikran. I was delighted that Aai’s chapattis are mentioned in the song!

What children songs did you grow-up listening to?

When a rainy day meant happy memories

Sitting in office I was yet again seeing social media feeds of Mumbai’s flooded roads. Uprooted trees, railway tracks flowing with water, cars submerged, colleagues and friends struggling to reach to work. Helpless citizens monitoring the rain situation on social media and WhatsApp groups.

I thought to myself. These are not the memories of a rainy day I had as a kid growing up in this city known for its monsoon. The month of June meant reopening of school, classrooms and corridors filled with the smell of new raincoats and gumboots. We use to look forward to the month of July, a chance to get that one mandatory rainy day holiday.

Staying at Dadar West, travelling to my school in Hindu Colony, Dadar East use to be fun during monsoons. Then too, the low lying areas of Dadar TT, Hindu Colony, Matunga were prone to water logging. On the days it rained heavily and school bus service was suspended, we use to eagerly wade through the water and walk home. Crossing the famous Tilak Bridge, connecting Dadar East and West, on a rainy day with friends is my everlasting school memory. Enjoying corn on cob, tamarind and other roadside picks was our feast.

At home the rainy day meant pampering and playing with friends. Grandmother’s nudge was all it required to bunk school and tuitions. Listening to pitter patter of the rain against our roof, watching the rains lashing against the window was my favourite timepass. Some days we use to venture outside to get wet or watch local boys play football at a garden nearby.

This badaas attitude continued during college as I joined Ruia. Later a long drive to Marine Drive, Worli Seaface was added to the rainy day plan. Then I started working and 26th July happened. The deluge that gripped Mumbai has completely changed what monsoon meant for this city.

Memories since then are flooded with instances of severe water logging, loss of property and lives. While the popular ‘Spirit of Mumbai’ is high, every monsoon has increasingly started affecting the mobility – bringing the city to a standstill. More so, the earlier badass attitude is now clouded and I have to think twice before travelling to my office on a rainy day, which is barely 10 minutes away from my house.